Playlist

From the recent set of my 45 finds:

BUFFALO SPRINGFIELD – Mr. Soul

COASTERS – Turtle Dovin’

LOTHAR & THE HAND PEOPLE – Yes, I Love You

FLEETWOOD MAC – Oh Well – Part 1

SIMON & GARFUNKEL – Big Bright Green Pleasure Machine, The

KOOPER, AL – You Never Know Who Your Friends Are

SEVILLE, DAVID – Witch Doctor

HARVEY, ALEX / S.A.H.B. – Gamblin’ Bar Room Blues

ALANSKI, JAY – Rock ‘n’ Roll Qui Danse

MENTAL AS ANYTHING – Instrumental As Anything

GREENFIELD & COOK – Only Lies

JONES, TOM – Day By Day

HOT CHOCOLATE – Love Is Life

SNIPS – Waiting For Tonight

HUMAN LEAGUE – Being Boiled

JONES, GRACE – Nipple To The Bottle

ENO, BRIAN – Lion Sleeps Tonight, The

10cc – Dreadlock Holiday

ALPERT, HERB / TIJUANA BRASS – Zazueira

FAME, GEORGIE – Ballad Of Bonnie and Clyde, The

CREAM – I eel Free

V.A. – History of Rhythm & Blues (promo 45) Atlantic Records

Obscure Records

8-26-10         

Obscure Records

From 2006: I used to read Melody Maker and New Musical Express a lot.  I do not remember how / where I first heard of “Obscure Records”, the custom label from Brian Eno (first via Island Records, later with Eno’s then-new partner, Polydor Records) of ‘slightly difficult’ (i.e. ambient) music that released a mere 10 vinyl albums in a little over 2 years.  I believe Eno was “executive producer” of all 10 titles.  In most cases, it was the first time I had ever heard of most of the artists.  I worked in a hippie record store that stocked all of these titles.  At the time, I remember not knowing that the series had ceased – “When’s #11 coming?”.  This label never had any singles.  I own all 10 LP’s.  It’s not ‘rock music’.

OBS 1  BRYARS, GAVIN – SINKING OF THE TITANIC

1975 2 TRKS

He’s famous for having synched “Jesus’ Blood Never Failed Me Yet” sung by a tramp to orchestral music.  I believe he’s taken seriously as a modern classical composer – at least by the UK avant-garde classicists.

OBS 2  HOBBS, CHRISTOPHER / JOHN ADAMS / GAVIN BRYARS – ENSEMBLE PIECES

1975 4 TRKS

I don’t remember this one at all, but I’ve kept it for over 30 years.  Must listen to it again soon, eh?

OBS 3  ENO, BRIAN – DISCREET MUSIC

1975 4 TRKS

Probably the best selling of this entire series – as many people foolishly bought it thinking it was more pop songs from Mr. Eno…but it isn’t – it’s “process” music made by machines that… (snore) Used to be the sole album in this series that I had on CD.

OBS 4  TOOP, DAVID / MAX EASTLEY – NEW AND REDISCOVERED MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS

1975 7 TRKS

I remember liking this one a lot, but…bet I haven’t played it in 30+ years.  Mr. Toop writes books on music these days.  I think he got quite into hip-hop / beats.  AND he was an Ivor Cutler side-man!

OBS 5  CAGE, JOHN / JAN STEELE – VOICES AND INSTRUMENTS

1976 8 TRKS with ROBERT WYATT

Mr. Cage was merely the author – I believe this is a Jan Steele album – with Mr. Robert Wyatt singing on it!  (Obviously, a highlight in this series – a recognizable name!)

OBS 6  NYMAN, MICHAEL – DECAY MUSIC

1976 2 TRKS

Now this guy I really like!  I think this is his first released album – his ‘debut’ is usually considered to be his self-titled LP on JVC / Sheet about ’81 or ’82.  He’s a famous film music composer these days (“The Piano” etc.) – I’d buy this on CD, if it were on CD.  Neat stuff.  I like it!

OBS 7  PENGUIN CAFÉ ORCHESTRA – MUSIC FROM THE PENGUIN CAFÉ

1976 11 TRKS with SIMON JEFFES

I was sad when I read Simon Jeffes’ obituary on the internet…I remember this music (first album) being used in the film “Malcolm” (an Australian film with Colin Friels). P.C.O. were reasonably popular here for a while, weren’t they?  They have lots of LP’s & CD’s (and a video or two).  I have their first album on CD, but with a completely different cover.

OBS 8  WHITE, JOHN / GAVIN BRYARS – MACHINE MUSIC

1978 5 TRKS

I don’t remember this one at all, but I’ve kept it for over 30 years.  I bet electric machines make the music.  I have no idea who John White is.  And I only really know who Gavin Bryars is from other LP’s in this series.

OBS 9  PHILLIPS, TOM – IRMA – AN OPERA BY TOM PHILLIPS

1978 2 TRKS

I don’t remember this one at all, but I’ve kept it for over 30 years.  I later bought a Tom Phillips CD, “Six of Hearts” – a ’93 recording released in ’97.  Years later, I found a 1975 Tom Philips LP on a tiny UK label (Mayer), “Words and Music” (1975).  Presumably modern UK 20th century classical music.

OBS 10  BUDD, HAROLD – PAVILLION OF DREAMS

1978 5 TRKS

I wonder how Eno got onto him?  My fading memory tells me this one was a tad sleepy-bye. Yet it was years before ‘Ambient’ or ‘New Age’ music…and I’ve enjoyed other albums by Harold Budd, and I even own some of his “Advance” label stuff.  He wound up on “Opal Records”, yet another ‘Eno’ label.  No surprise there…

I’m not certain how many of these ever ended up being issued as CD’s.  As I previously noted, the Penguin Café orchestra debut certainly got re-issued a few times, but always with a new cover design.  Certainly part of the appeal of this series was the oblique LP covers that all of them had.

I never noticed any other releases by John White, Jan Steele, Max Eastley or Christopher Hobbs.  They’re probably in the avant-garde section near the classical LP’s / CD’s – where one typically finds Gavin Bryars titles.  For some reason, the Penguin Café Orchestra titles are usually found in the ‘rock’ section (or certainly “P” misc.)

= = =

I’m taking an extra day or two off – see you in September!

Minimalism

8-25-10


Minimalism

The other night, I read a thing on the dreaded internet about some young guy who decided to sell all his possessions and about what a ‘minimalist aesthetician’ this made him.  What?

Yes, I like having a deep knowledge of music, but sometimes I wish I didn’t “have all this crap”.  But if I didn’t have it all – how would I listen to it?  Keep in mind, I am a ‘maximalist aesthetician’ (?) – I want to hear stuff sounding nice.

Other times, of course – I don’t want to hear much.  Which is why I chose to play two CD’s by Brian Eno last night.

I remember very well being a young person and spending my hard-earned allowance on “No Pussyfooting” (sorry, I forgot the parenthesis) by Fripp & Eno – yes, it’s Robert Fripp from King Crimson and Brian Eno from Roxy Music – but it doesn’t much sound like either of those bands.  There aren’t any drums.  Or songs.

Well, to my 2010 ears, “No Pussyfooting” sounded too busy for my mood.  I fished around in a handy carton of paper sleeve CD’s and finally found a CD I could fall asleep to:  Brian Eno “Discreet Music”.  No drums or songs here either.  Yes, I’ve got an LP of it, but…it’s probably in another room.  And as I was planning on resting, I didn’t want to have to get up when the LP side ended on my manual turntable.

If I got rid of all my CD’s, I couldn’t have had last night’s experience!

So, I quickly perused the cover – can’t read the liner notes, they’re tiny!  And the ones printed on the insert are in Japanese.  I had forgotten that Gavin Bryars was involved with the making of “Discreet Music” – he did some arranging on Side Two.

Mental note to self:  Next time you’re in San Francisco, look and see if they still have those Japanese paper sleeve versions of the other really quiet Eno albums, like “Music For Airports” or the other two or three ones that look like they only have maps for covers.  Maybe they’ll be quiet and you can fall asleep to them.

Years ago, I remember trying to fall asleep to Basil Kirchin’s “Worlds Within Worlds, Parts 3 & 4” – not exactly what I would call easy listening.  That album even has liner notes by Brian Eno!  Needless to say, it didn’t work, it kept me awake – and when I woke up 3 or 4 hours too early, I had to start inventorying a record store!  Yes, I have slept in a record store before.  Not unusual, just part of my 5 decade experience in this place we call home – Earth.  I did all sorts of other unusual stuff, too.

But listening?  Now I’m happy to have really quiet music that doesn’t command my active participation or attention.  And it can be re-produced at a nice, clear low level.

I guess it’s OK to listen to all those LP’s on the Obscure label now, eh?

25,000

8-24-10

25,000

Towards the end of July, 2010 – the list of titles in my collection hit 25,000.  I noticed this as I was entering new titles obtained at the Buena Park swap meet.  Some time ago, I made a decision to not let my “collection” grow beyond 25,000 titles.         In other words, new stuff comes in, but something must go out.

As does not need detailing here, I have monstrously over-collected; multiple copies of albums (usually variants), as well as trying / buying titles that end up being “not required”.  But I usually don’t so anything about it – Into the collection it goes!

I went to San Francisco over the weekend of my birthday, and got a few more titles – more titles had to come out of my list to accommodate them.  As of today, this system is working fairly well.  My list is at 25K, not under, not over.

In a perfect world, I would like to get my collection down to an unspecified number of titles – 20,000?  18,000?  I never decided.

Looking at this scenario from the opposite perspective, I have recently started my “Ultimate Collection” project (i.e. If I had to start over, it would be with these titles).  How big will this list get to be?  At one time, I thought my “List” would / should top out at about 8,000 titles (17,000 fewer titles than I now have?  Now that’s over-collecting!)

Where do I store all of this stuff?  I have filled shelving in two rooms, and there are many cartons of CD’s, 45’s, even LP’s in two additional rooms.  I would describe my storage condition as burdensome.

All of which is not of concern to anybody who reads this.  It’s my own fault for having too much stuff.  And certainly there are hundreds…thousands of titles that I do not really need, for any purpose – that are in my “list”.  Can I assemble the master file for “60’s singles that I remember and like”?  Probably.  How many titles of any given genre do I have to own to ‘understand’ it?  Who knows…

What am I going to do with my collection?  Well…what I am doing is writing about it, listening to it, sharing it a bit and attempting to clarify what I think about it (in writing).

The good news: I am fairly happy with my big collection and I love listening to it and playing with it.  The bad news: I want some floor space back – this collection takes up way too much room!

It is certainly my 21st century conundrum.  I want a large music collection, but I don’t want to have it take up too much space.  Yes, a good portion of my collection is of aesthetic value – even beyond the music contained therein.

Japanese Jazz

8-23-10


Japanese Jazz

I always have my tentacles out to try and find something that’s new to me, and interesting.  In addition to the Strange Days magazine that I get from Japan by subscription, I sometimes pick up a Japanese magazine at the Kinokuniya bookstore called “Record Collectors Magazine” – I can’t read it, of course, but I can look at the pictures and ‘read’ the advertisements and reviews.

Nippon Columbia Records, who are 100 years old this year, have been issuing some very cool looking “Jazz Series” CD’s over the last year or two – that’s right, Japanese Modern Jazz!

MODERN JAZZ PLAYBOYS – MODERN JAZZ SHOW CASE, COCB-53831, 1961 12 TRKS 4 x bonus tracks

INOMATA, TAKESHI / WEST LINERS – LINER NOTE, COCB-53832, 1967 12 TRKS

HARA, NOBUO / HOZAN YAMAMOTO – NEW JAZZ IN JAPAN, COCB-53833, 1968 10 TRKS

MISAGO, T. / TOKYO CUBAN BOYS – FIESTA EN JAPON, COCB-53834, 1966 5 TRKS

HARADA, TADAYUKI – PLAYBOY’S THEME, COCB-53835, 1968 10 TRKS

AKIYOSHI, TOSHIKO / JAPAN JAZZ ALL STARS –TOSHIKO & MODERN JAZZ, COCB-53621, 1964 7 TRKS

MODERN JAZZ PLAYBOYS – MODERN JAZZ SCREEN MOOD, COCB-53622, 1960 12 TRKS mono

YAGI, MASAO & HIS GROUP – MODERN JAZZ BLUE MOOD, COCB-53623, 1965 12 TRKS

SOUL MEDIA – FUNKY STUFF, COCB-53624, 1974 8 TRKS

ITABASHI, FUMIO – NATURE, COCB-53625, 1979 5 TRKS

So, with two sets of re-issues in this series, the time frame is 1960 to 1979.  The cost of each CD is roughly $23.50 (2,000 yen at roughly ‘current’ 2010 exchange rate) – and I don’t believe I would ever have seen any of these for sale in the US.  Jazz time now!

Toshiko Akiyoshi is probably the most famous name here, to US jazz fans.  There is actually a Toshiko Akiyoshi section in the jazz department at Amoeba in Hollywood!  The only artist represented with two titles is the Modern Jazz Playboys (who have great album covers).  In my LP collection, I have some titles from Nobuo Hara.  If I read the designations correctly, only 1 or 2 of these titles has been on CD previously, most are making their CD debuts.

Soul Media “Funky Stuff” was a real surprise.  Very decent 1974 clavinet jazz mixed with ‘funky’ rhythm section – and a great Kool & The Gang cover version (“Funky Stuff”).  Speaking of cover versions, the Tadayuki Harada CD has a ton of great ‘easy hits’:  “Theme from The Monkees”, “A Whiter Shade of Pale”, “Going Out of My Head” etc.

So, all of this stuff was well worth my hard earned dosh.  I now have a basic idea of Japanese 60’s & 70’s jazz on the Nippon Columbia label – some very groovy stuff!  The most “Japanese” of these titles is definitely the Nobuo Hara with Hozan Yamamoto title, jazz mixed with Japanese flute!

So, I keep listening and learning.  I have lots of stuff, but there’s always more to learn.  Anybody want to hear a sampler of this series?  Drop me an email.  I’ll fix you up with a sampler.

Playlist

Playlist for a Friday night:

MR. OIZO – Skatesteak

WILDE FLOWERS, THE – Memories (The Soft Machine)

BLEGVAD, PETER – Loss To Mourn

MacCOLL, KIRSTY – All I Ever Wanted

CORDUROY – Thing For Your Love

SWING SLOW – Caravan

A CERTAIN RATIO – Day 2 (House Mix)

TOWNSHEND, PETE – Secondhand Love

GREAVES, JOHN – Deck Of The Moon

HAMMILL, PETER – Unconscious Life, The

MANN, MANFRED – Last Train To Clarksville, The

Ultimate Collection #4

8-20-10                    

Gruppo Sportivo (Ultimate Collection #4)

For the 4th title in My Ultimate Collection, the 3rd album by Gruppo Sportivo, “The Buddy Odor Stop – Buddy Odor Is A Gas” (1979) is an obvious choice.  I acquainted myself with Gruppo Sportivo at the time of their debut album, merely because I could see Robert-Jan Stips’ name on the cover (as producer).  I had been a huge Supersister fan for most of the 70’s.

If I choose the original LP of The Buddy Odor Stop, it’s a glorious original Dutch pressing, with custom labels, a heavy inner-sleeve and a sticker included.  If it’s the CD re-issue, it includes an additional album, the original Dutch version of their debut, “10 Mistakes” (1977) – so I will be going with the CD issue (but I will also probably keep one of the several versions of the Buddy Odor Stop LP that I already own) – “10 Mistakes” is great, too – but this entry is just for “Buddy Odor Is A Gas”.

If you’re familiar with Gruppo Sportivo, you already know about their fun and clever English-language pop music from The Hague in The Netherlands.  GS main-man Hans Vandenburg came from the Leo Unger group.  Yes, I went to the trouble to seek out “Run To The Sunshine” (1974) by Leo Unger, just to see what Hans Vandenburg looked like, pre-Sportivo!

I started visiting Holland in 1979.  Even on that first visit, I made the journey to Aad Link’s office in The Hague, “Rock In Waterland” (Trekweg 8!).  I visited Holland many times between 1979 and 1992, and Aad was always very nice to me, finding me stuff from the groups he worked with: Supersister, Gruppo Sportivo, The Nits…I was once given a bunch of Gruppo Sportivo posters – which I promptly lost while riding the trains around northern Europe!

So, the pop songs on “The Buddy Odor Stop “ are perfect; perfect Sportivo, perfect pop songs.  I love every one of them; there’s no telling just how deeply engrained this album is in my psychological make-up.  It’s beautiful stuff.  It always made me sad that this album didn’t seem to be very well received at the time of it’s release – no US issue, no big tour…the original group fell apart and Hans re-grouped in 1980 for “Copy Copy” (goodbye Josee and Meike!).

But in my universe, this is one of the best albums of the 1970’s and certainly my favorite album of 1979 – and easily my favorite album from Hans Vandenburg / Gruppo Sportivo.  If I could take this album with me when I leave, it will have been all worth it.  Someone on Earth created the near-perfect pop album – in English, in Holland, in 1979.  Go figure!

I think it is safe to say that My Ultimate Collection cannot be ranked accurately.  I think at some point any title in the “Top 10” has been my favorite record of all time…but I keep listening, and something else gets my attention.  But I most certainly return from time-to-time to pretty much everything that’s near the top of my list.

Cut Outs

8-19-10

Cut Outs

I recently had an exchange with a friend in England who wrote to me wondering why legit stock copies of US 45’s sometimes had drilled holes…Frank zappa 45’s were what we were discussing…

For 60’s Verve, a 45 gets scheduled / released.  Mono promo white label is sent to radio stations and some copies are given to ‘reps’ – the men whose job it is to sell the regular release to accounts.  Buyers at distributors evaluate the promo samples they are given and decide what to order for their business.  After that decision is made, buyer usually takes the 45’s home, keeps ’em or gives them to friends – or sells then, on the sly.

Stock copies are then pressed in fairly minimum quantities, unless the orders from distributors indicate a larger pressing is in order.  That being said, a typical stock small run is 3,000 units – which would seem to be the standard involved for typesetting 2 x labels and running a load.  Promo copies might be as little as 500 copies.  Label typesetting variants creep in when a record is re-pressed – usually due to demand.

The stock copies go out into the world, and sit in someone inventory.  Sometimes, they don’t sell at all.  When a warehouse supervisor looks at verve VK-10570, he notes in his order book that all 25 copies they ordered have not sold, so a request to return the records is prepared and sent to the record company.  If they approve the return authorization request, they can box ’em up, send ’em back – and their account receives a credit of the original purchase price of the box of 45’s, less the specified shipping amount.

As the 70’s approached, organized crime crept in – they would print counterfeits records, box ’em up and try to return them to the labels, often falsifying paperwork etc.  MGM / verve was one of the labels that ‘got involved’ with cooperating with organized crime, to defraud the (legit) record labels.

Back to the box of VK-10570 45’s: They have now arrived back at Verve’s Chicago-area warehouse, checked in, credit given to the distributor that returned them.  By this time, Verve will know if their 45 is going to sell or not.  I have heard that sometimes, returns were merely put back on the shelf, awaiting a customer’s order.  But more often than not – the box of dead dog 45’s will be sent to a drilling room.  The 45 (or LP) is drilled through the label, and then sold off for pennies on the dollar.  The drilled hole will tell the returns manager to not accept and / or credit a drilled hole 45 for full price, if someone buys it and tries to return it.  So, that’s how a blue label Verve 45 ends up with a hole drilled through it’s label.

Similar story with how LP covers end up with a hole drilled through the cover.  Another way they can get rid of the ‘drilled hole’ unwanted titles:  they can call an old guy in Evanston who has a “Cut Out Distributor” called XXXXX XXXX, and sell him all the drilled hole titles for pennies; he will then generate a list of titles that he distributes to thousands to record retailers, “LP’s for 50 cents!  45’s for 10 cents!”.

This is the fate that awaits LP’s that get pulled from a catalogue, such as FZ’s Verve LP’s, once he signed to Warner / Reprise.  It took a while for the lawyers to figure out that they owned the titles they had paid for and could continue selling them for another 10 years (hence late 70’s Verve issues with white/blue labels).

Peter Hammill – Rikki Nadir

8-18-10                     Peter Hammill / Rikki Nadir

Recently, I listened once again to Peter Hammill’s 5th solo album, “Nadir’s Big Chance” (1975) and reacquainted myself with his alter ego “Rikki Nadir” – the rock ‘n’ roller to Hammill’s usual ‘prog rock singer-songwriter’.  I remember that there was even a 45 for the track “Birthday Special” that was actually credited to Rikki Nadir (but kept a “P. Hammill” writing credit).  I am guessing that it necessitated an alter ego for Mr. Hammill to keep up his pace of more solo albums than regular albums with his band Van Der Graaf Generator.

Well, a rock & roll album of 3-4 minute songs it is – as opposed to VDGG’s side-long epic works.  Per it’s 1974/5 recording / release date, it has the sound of 3rd or 4th album Roxy Music, in places – maybe it’s just the use of clavinet?

I am one of the few people that I know that literally did the Van Der Graaf Generator albums in the order of release.  I found “The Aerosol Grey Machine” LP first, in a 99 cent bin – and I tried it because I thought they might be German!  Silly me!  Onto the 2nd album next, “The Least We Can Do Is Wave To Each Other” – first a Probe US LP, then a Charisma UK LP.  I opted for copies of the 3rd VDGG LP “H To He – Who Am The Only One” on both US Dunhill and UK Charisma LP’s, too.  Then comes the first Hammill solo album, “Fool’s Mate” – which I now own a re-mastered CD of.  I got the US LP for VDGG album #4, “Pawn Hearts” – and it took me years to get around to obtaining a UK copy, as I noticed that it had one less track than the US issue!  Then Hammill solo albums #2, #3, #4…

By the time “Nadir’s Big Chance” walked down the pike, I already had 4 LP’s ( + variants) of Van Der Graaf Generator and 4 different Peter Hammill solo albums!  This makes Hammil & Co. one of the most prolific of the late 60’s / early 70’s British singer songwriters!  Roughly 8 albums in approx. 7 years!

Hammill’s 3rd & 4th solo albums, “The Silent Corner & The Empty Stage” and “In Camera” had been real favorites of mine.  “Nadir’s Big Chance” nearly didn’t sound like it was being made by the same guy!  Yes, the voice is the same, but – no erratic time changes, no “electronics”, no science fiction subject matter…Hammill’s 6th solo album, “Over” was easily instantly recognizable as the author of “The Silent Corner & The Empty Stage” and “In Camera” – Rikki Nadir has been a fluke, a “one-off”.  And onward I moved.

With as many LP’s as I have, not everything under the sun gets a second listen.  I thought enough of Hammill as an artist to try and obtain all of his original 70’s albums on CD, so when it came time to re-evaluate “Rikki Nadir”, I could just pop it on, while I rested at home one afternoon.  Out poured a flow of “UK 1975” – worthy of any artist working in England at that time.  No, not quite glam rock – a bit more in the direction of Roxy Music, as I previously mentioned.  1975 rock music – from England.  Listen and enjoy.

Progfest in Japan!

8-17-10

Progfest in Japan!


http://clubcitta.co.jp/001/progfes/

That’s right, kids!  Progfest in Tokyo next week!  I’d pay to see Steve Hackett play live!  I wonder who is in Renaissance these days?  I had no idea that Yoninbayashi had re-formed and were playing again.  And what a cool Roger Dean poster!

Regular readers of this blog know that I am a card-carrying subscriber to Strange Days magazine.  They often have wonderful pictorials on progressive rock – no, the magazine is written in Japanese, so I can’t ”read” it – but the lists are usually written in romaggi (an alphabet I can read and write in).  Nobody but nobody beats the Japanese magazines when it comes to making lists of stuff!

Here’s how quickly things move in Japan:  How long ago were SHM-CD’s introduced in Japan?  2 years ago? Among the first titles offered were the catalogue of Emerson, Lake & Palmer – I quickly went for their debut album.  Anything for a good-sounding CD of that album!  I saw in a recent issue of Strange Days that they’re being re-released (again as SHM-CD’s) but now they have bonus tracks! ELP albums have never had bonus tracks!

I have also recently waltzed in the prog rock parade in Japan – almost all of the Yes titles were recently newly re-mastered, including “Big Generator”, which was not re-mastered by Rhino Records in this country.  I confess that bit was very aesthetically pleasing to see all the Yes albums re-mastered as little LP cover CD’s – I actually picked up a few of them (as I found them used in L.A.)

And yep – geek boy here bought a UK Genesis box of the first five albums ostensibly to have them as SACD’s.  And the first seven Moody Blues albums as SACD’s, too.  So, let’s just say that I have recent editions of all the mainstream progressive rock titles that I am willing to admit that I own.  Who knows?  Maybe even some of this stuff will find it’s way to “My Ultimate Collection” eventually?

Of course, the very thought of progressive rock summons up ‘obscurity’ – and the stuff I have mentioned here today would all pretty much fly on mainstream FM stations.  Don’t worry, I also have little album cover CD’s of tons of great obscure Italian progressive rock and “20th Century Classical” artist Walter Marchetti – who definitely won’t be on any radio station anytime soon.

But my carnival mask of ‘prog rock fan’ is just one of many that I can wear.  I have jazz records.  I went to see Level 42 at the end of July.  I collect 1960’s US C&W music (well, certain artists).  The Monochrome Set!  I have 700+ comedy LP’s.  I like pop music from New Zealand.  So, I am not just pidgeon-holed into being only a ‘prog rock fan’.  I am listening to all sorts of stuff around here, buddy!